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helped pave the way for africa's first democratically elected female head of state. two days after her appearance on the program, she was awarded the nobel peace prize. also tonight we will preview a conversation from next week on the issue of poverty. beginning next tuesday night, a special conversation called vision for a new america, featuring a terrific line above guests. -- a terrific lineup of guest. plus, a preview of a special event on this program starting next week. coming up right now. >> there is a saying that dr. king had that said there is always the right time to do the right thing. i just try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway to completely eliminate hunger, and we have a lot of work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> in october 2011 we were on our to be joined by leymah gbowee. she proved the difference of one single person can make in our world. she encourages th
and persons of color, especially after women voters secured his victory in last fall's election. although president obama wanted to nominate susan rice as secretary of state to replace hillary clinton, so far he's appointed men to head up the departments of state, treasury, and defense. and the high-profile position of cia director also went to a male. long time friend of this show, h,lda salis surprised everyone by announcing her resignation this week. do would care how many women and women of color in the cabinet. >> the diversity of this nation. this is a president that said that that is important to him, he's lived up to it i believe he will do it in terms of his second. >> i think mitt romney has an opportunity to bring over his binder of women and hand it over to president obama which we've heard has had hostile environment in the white house. >> i think the bottom line is, he did fairly good job the first time, he hasn't delivered yet. he needs to. diversity at the highest level of government is going to deliver better results and better electoral and outcomes, what is he waiting f
election process. they have done everything in their power to be first. everybody wants to be fought over in a presidential election, everybody wants to monopolize the candidates and the nation's attention. so we're iowa, the first in the caucus, you have to spend tons of time here, we're new hampshire, the first primary, you have to spend tons of time here, mitt romney, you have to move here, you, too, john huntsman, we want all your attention. every state wants to do everything they can for the presidential candidates' attention, they all want a battle ground, they all want to be fought over. or at least they used to want to be fought over. something weird happened since the last election. and it is really starting to happen. i think you should know about it. in wisconsin and michigan and ohio and pennsylvania and virginia and florida, there is now noise that these states, which were at pretty hard fought in the presidential election, these were all battleground states, they're all fighting to make themselves less important in the next election, all of them voted democratic for presiden
in politics, san antonio mayor julian castro and his air dentical twin, joaquin castro, just elected to congress. that's a big group but there's a lot to talk about on "face the nation." captioning sponsored by cbs from cbs news in washington, "face the nation" with bob schieffer. >> and good morning again. we welcome to the broadcast david plouffe architect of the president's election in 2008, again last year a key adviser in the administration throughout. let me ask you first about the situation in algeria where this awful terrorist attack took place. we know that there were seven americans at that compound, and the reports are one is dead. do you have any more information on any of the others? >> i don't this morning bob. obviously, if and when we have additional information, the state department will release that >> and what about this whole state of terrorism now? have we defeated al qaeda, as some in the administration were talking about earlier? >> well, we have i think decimated a lot of al qaeda's top leadership particularly in the afghanistan-pakistan region. but i think wh
presidential election. that was the election that cut short poppy bush's time in office, right? he was only a one-term president because he lost in 1992. democrats like to remember 1992 as a triumphant year for the democratic party because there was this young arkansas democratic governor bill clinton unseating an incumbent republican president. the uncomfortable part of that memory for democrats is that even though bill clinton did beat president bush in 1992 he did so with only 43% of the vote. bill clinton got 43% of the vote that year. president bush got 37% of the vote. and even though it is always a bad idea to do math on television, this one isn't that hard. if you add up 43 and 37 you do not get anywhere near 100% of the vote. what happened to the rest of the vote? the wacky thing about the 1992 election in terms of thinking about american binary red versus blue party politics is that another guy who ran that year, a third person, got almost 20% of the vote. it was ross perot, right? giant sucking sound. ross perot got a very large proportion of the vote for a third-party candidate.
to be a caretaker who was to fill the vacancy until the next election could be held. there were at least three sump committees, i think maybe four and some of them raised good sums of money. and my concern was that they were functioning as campaigns without actually being campaigns. the commission decided that they weren't campaigns under current law. but i think the commission agreed that the raising and spending of that size of money was not designed by the voters to be something that went unregulated. so the commission directed the staff to put together some provisions that would, as i said, regulate committed are designed to draft, particularly those that raise tangible sums of money. the reason for that is that a citywide campaign aimed at a single person still reaches people citywide, and would conceivably impact their decisions at the polling place based on the fact that you get someone to run for office by extolling their virtues. so these rectally simple to follow will treat under our law, such campaigns, such committees, excuse me, as primarily formed campaigns and therefore, report th
colleagues who have been reelected the newly elected. it is a special occasion to be here today. i wanted take this opportunity to second the nomination of supervisor cohen. let me begin by thanking president chiu for his service, for the work that he has done in the last four years. i think that it is a very critical task to be president; it certainly is not an easy challenge the deal with 11 very strong personalities on the board of supervisors. i do believe that each and every one of us was elected to this body for a reason. i think that each one of us brings a certain set of experiences and talents, and i think that each one of us has something to offer. and i do believe that it is important to provide different people an opportunity to serve in leadership roles. it is for that reason that i am seconding the nomination of supervisor cohen. i could stand here and second the nomination of supervisor kim. being a person of color gives you a certain perspective and being a man also gives you a certain perspective. i think it is quite telling that it has been 25 years to my
. >> norton. >> aye. >> wynns. >> seven ayes. >> now we proceed to the annual election of officers for the board of education. as a reminder to the board and public, this election is by voice vote. and we do not need a second, and it's permisable for a member to vote for themselves. good to know. board members you will vote by name. if only one nomination, or more than you vote by aye or nay. i declare that the floor is open for the nomination of president for board 2013. >> i would like to nominate our current vice president, rachel norton. >> any further? if no more, i declare the nomination closed. >> commissioner norton, i would like to move that we elect commissioner norton by acclimation. that needs a second. >> second. >> any other discussion? okay, we are good. thank you very much. [applause] i have the pleasure to announce that i have been elected president of the board. [laughter] i am now declaring nominations open for the office of vice president of the board of education for the year of 2013. any nominations? commissioner mendoza. >> it would be my honor to nominate sa
that struck me about this conversation is something that we learn about harvey milk. when he was first elected, he understood the significance of his election. i would like to share with you a part of what he said. it goes, the hope speech often talk about. this is what he said to use his own words: "two days after i was elected i got a phone call and the voice was quite young. it was from al tuna, pennsylvania. the person said things. you have to elected a people so that young child and thousands of people know that there is hope for a better tomorrow." without hope, gays, blacks, seniors, the "ss" give up. without hope life is not worth living. harvey closed, and you and you and you. you have to give them hope. as i think about this, i really think that that is what we are talking about. in this measure. we are talking about giving hope to so many people who live in parts of this country, parts of the world where they cannot fathom being true to who they are; they cannot fathom being honest to themselves let alone other people about their sexual orientation. something that struck me about
is riding high according to a poll. voters handed his administration a victory in a landslide election. two-thirds say they support abe's new cabinet. pollsters interviewed 1,138 people over the weekend. 64% of them back abe's cabinet. that is three times higher than the approval rating former prime minister's cabinet had before the election. 39% of those who support abe's cabinet say it seems better than others. 27% say they have expectations for its policies. 12% say they support the cabinet because it's led by the party they favor. our survey asks people about abe's recent economic stimulus package which is worth about $115 billion. 64% say they approve of the measure. 29% say they do not. our pollsters asked respondents about abe's position on dealing with deflation and the strong yen. he favors drastic monetary easing through close coordination with the bank of japan. 69% say they approve of this plan. 26% disapprove. >>> so after about three weeks in office, prime minister abe is sitting comfortably. he knows if his first time in the job that things can go sour fast. i spoke earlier w
terrorists. >> elections had been planned for april. that is now completely up in the air. even if the military intervention is a short one, mali is likely to remain politically unstable for some time to come. >> coming up, floods are causing havoc in the indonesian capital. >> first, here's a look at some of the news. >> syrian activists are reporting a new massacre by government forces. the syrian observatory for human rights says pro-assad troops killed more than 100 civilians on tuesday. witnesses are reported as saying troops hunting rebel fighters slotted entire families, including women and children -- slaughtered entire families including women and children. >> new demands come as pakistan's chief anti- corruption official refused the supreme court order to a rust -- arrest the prime minister over lack of evidence. m in the u.s. president's gun control proposals face an uncertain future. there's no majority in either house of congress with resistance from both republicans and democrats. gun supporters have also launched an advertising campaign against obama's move. the p
. and germany's ruling party tries to hold onto power in a key regional election. >> do i have remorse? absolutely. >> lance armstrong apologizes, but can he rebuilt his tarnished reputation? >>> the algerian hostage crisis is over. special forces stormed the remote gas plant, killing 11 gunmen after they took the lives of 74 hostages. -- took the lives of 7 4 hostages. dozens of people are still unaccounted for. at 29 gunmen said to have links with al qaeda are thought to have been killed. >> the first photo to emerge out of what happened shows hostages kneeling captive in the desert. in other pictures broadcast by algerian tv, they are shown group against a wall. we don't know how many of these people survived what was to come. army helicopter swooped over the complex as they were cornered by algerian special forces. the hopes of a clinical rescue operation and release of hostages have been dashed, state media reporting that seven hostages and 11 militants were killed in the final assault. workers from britain, the u.s., japan, and norway are still among those unaccounted for. in nor
for re-election, the president is free to pursue the agenda that will enshrine him. among america's greats were abe lincoln and thomas jefferson. for this u.s. president, the first african-american ever elected to the office, the historical legacy has already been written before he officially began his first term. four years ago, president barack obama welcomed the weight of that legacy casting himself as a blank canvas to project our lofty hopes for change and great expectations for the nation. the first item on his agenda, that bright legacy and suggested those hopes were well placed. president obama tried and succeeded where previous democratic presidents tried and failed. he enacted legislation that provided universal health care for all americans. four years after the first inauguration our lofty hopes for what was possible have been dragged back down to earth by the cold hand of reality and a republican dominated house of representatives. this time around, our great expectations may feel like managed expectations. take a look at president obama's second term official portrai
is in this election, the most recent election, that the future of our country kind of showed up and voted in a way that no one was really expecting that they would given what you surmised which was a sense of perhaps disillusionment or in the professor's words, the revival being over. but in fact, i think they came back more seasoned, more realistic, more determined to do the hard work to bring about the kind of political consensus that we need and particularly in the state of maryland, if you look at the two issues that were passed on referendum the religious communities, the immigrant communities, people of color, they all came together in ways that totally surprised the expectations given what was perceived to be such a mood of pessimism, even just months before. >> what about you, professor trulear? do you sense any little glimmer of hope anywhere that things can be better? >> oh, i think there's a lot of hope. i think that it's just more grounded in reality, which is, i think, the gist of the bishop's comments that there is a sense that there were things that were accomplished during the firs
elections of lower saxony is busy choosing their parliament and the result is looking extremely close. it is being seen as a dress rehearsal for several elections in september and a verdict on chancellor angela merkel herself. david mcalester represents her party and is close to her. the poll suggests is neck-and- neck with the opposition social democrats and the green party. with go live now to hand over. what is the latest you are hearing there? >> the latest we are hearing is that it's going to be a long night. we will have to wait for the regional polling stations to be counted. the parties are really neck-and- neck and it could be angela merkel's christian democratic union or it could be the greens and social democrats. this is a bellwether region. this has farmers, big industry, europe's biggest automaker, volkswagen is located here. the religious split is catholic and protestant. what happens here is will what happened across the country generally speaking. that is why angela merkel made seven campaign stops here along with david mcallister, the christian democratic premier in
as a permanent campaign, where everyday is election day in campaigning and election may make for uncompromising minds. you stand in your principles, mobilize your base, drawing endless amounts of money. 20 for seven new site will cover his politics is that it's a horserace and the horse are on steroids coming in to fund the campaign. but we mean by the uncompromising mindset is a minor that cared towards election and not towards governing. >> host: president gutmann come at you right to chew in your co-author, dennis thompson as we observe the changing scene in american politics, we came to believe the general problem could be addressed by concentrating on a particular institution, the united states congress. why is that? >> guest: if you want to see the problem with the uncompromising mindset, look no further than the 112th congress in washington. gridlock, nothing gets past the least legislation in the last 50 years. why? everybody's campaigning all the time. there's very little by way of relationships across the aisle and we ran up to a break of the debt ceiling crisis in compromise was reac
, and fighting in elections to change the supreme court. >> what would you think of having a national general assembly modeled on the original continental congress in philadelphia beginning on july 4 of 2012? coming up with a list of grievances that this assembly debated. >> lawrence blessing has talked about a new constitutional convention. i think it is early. i think it is tricky. i do not mean to sound too conservative. when you say to make a list of grievances, we could sit in this room and come up with a list of six ideas or grievances that need to be made real and lead to change. you need to find your issue, work in your community. work in the organizing around the issue. link up with groups doing work. if it is student debt, find ways to take on the banks, local legislators, and congress in the short term. is not very revolutionary. at the event we did on 9/11, i said i felt this country was in a pre-revolutionary moment. it was about a week before occupy was street launched. i believe in evolution, not revolution. >> katrina, did you read the foreign affairs article that backs up the
- connected crowd. what was more important, the first time barack obama was elected. first african american president or the fact that he was just real. let's go inside. i want to tell you some of what they had to say. >> reporter: the historic theater was jumping on stage with the kind of jazz they want to improve. >> i want them to leave the president alone. >> reporter: but outside the upscale gathering waited. >> they have a little more power. >> they have supported president barack obama a second time. and their money, their campaign, and their votes. >> mitch mcconnell said he would be a one-term president. four years ago a line of symbolism and it was. a lot of people are telling us tonight they are looking for programs from the president from this point on. >> on gun controls, barack knows what to do. >> i'd like to see him focus more on education. everything starts with education. >> reporter: they are headlining this private inaugural party. planning to be here well into the morning. the mlk holiday, most have it off. >> the whole world out there loves our president. it's not just
an inflation target of 2%. >>> people in israel are casting ballots in a prime election. benjamin netanyahu is expected to keep his job. >>> welcome to nhk "newsline." central bank policy makers have agreed to give shinzo abe what he wants, a 2% inflation target. it's part of abe's plan to tackle deflation with bolder, monetary easing measures. bank of japan and eight others agreed on it saying they. boj officials have previously made it a goal to bring 1% inflation within reach but the new, clearer target requires some bold steps. the document also addresses the role of the government in revitalizing japan's economy. it describes how politicians should promote growth and restore fiscal health. along with drafting the joint statement, boj officials have agreed to introduce open-ended asset purchasing. under a new program from january 2014 the central bank will purchase a certain amount of financial assets every month. no termination date is being set for the scheme. the new measure will expand the total size of the asset purchase program, or app, by about 10 trillion yen, or $110 billion, i
is already a lame duck. he's gun his second election. we've already talked about people will succeed him. by his own calculation he's got 16 months to make it his mark. he has to come out of the box, fast and energetic. he's coming out on guns, immigration, fiscal policy. he needs to push the other side defering to his judgment while he has the opportunity to do it. >> if you agree, chuck that he has left radge that he may never have again, let's just talk about the gun part of this. does he have the leverage to get all of these plans he came up with, far more specific thing than people suspected through this congress. >> because of the tragedy in connecticut this was an issue that suddenly had to be pushed through front burner unlike things like fiscal policy and immigration. and i think the answer to your question is we'll have to wait and see but there's a lot of doubters including in congress with the big things like the assault weapons ban. it's lost probably so much support that that probably won't happen. he might be able to get the university background check. that seems fairly f
. the challenge to us is to remember what we learned when we first entered this movement, that you never elect someone to make change happen for you. you elect somebody to make it a little easier for your movement to keep on making change after. and so, brothers and sisters, i implore you tonight, have a good time, party caressed well, then get right back on the battlefield tuesday morning because we took our democracy back and we ain't giving it up to nobody. thank you and god bless. fire it up. fire it up. fire it up! god bless you all. >> that was president of the naacp, benjamin jealous, speaking at the peace ball, voices of hope and resistance come here in washington, d.c. on sunday night. we will be back with more from the peace ball couldn't angela davis, sonia sanchez and others in a moment. ♪ [music break] >> sweet honey in the rock performing at the peace ball last night. this is "democracy now!," democracynow.org, the war and peace report. i'm amy goodman. we are broadcasting from washington, d.c., bringing you special coverage of today's inauguration as hundreds of thousands gath
to the election if they declare that he dies tomorrow which there is a rumor that they would do that actually going around now, that if he would be declared dead and they called an election within 30 days and the opposition won, meaning the sympathy vote for the candidate which is difficult after what we saw on december 16th and dhaka election we just talked about, chavez has 20 of 23 governors. 11 of the governors that were run by the chavez party are former military officials, including four ministers of defense, who are now governors of their respective states. several of them are all along the office of the control campaign list because of their work with the farc so we have a situation where people are in control of things, so that even if henry embrey de four e elected president in this election it's the opposite -- he's the head of the opposition who ran against chavez and got a 45% to 55% but we are talking about to the even if he was to win, he still would have institutions that are controlled by the chavez government including the supreme court which we just pointed out, including t
are seeing since the elections, that's for sure, a question who he will be, as he moves into the second term slam. lot of talk about lincoln's second inaugural, which i think by standards is the gold standard and the greatest of the second inaugural addresses that we know. >> because? >> because it came at the pivotal moment of maximum peril for the nation and it was a real statement about how we could be larger as a democracy and reembrace those who had been against the country and come back together. but i have been looking at franklin ross vel's second inaugur inaugural, 1937, which is interesting, because it was a very can candid, honest progress report about what had not yet been accomplished coming out of the great depression but also a statement how we had to come together, useself government as the most noble expression. and use very precise terms, if you go back and look that the speech there is very real room for president obama now to say to the country, these are the things that will are left undone that we, together, must find a way to do >> michael, as a speechwriter first, who
. make sure you know that what we're celebrating is not the election or swearing-in of a president. what we're doing is celebrating each celebrating this incredibl nation that we call home. and after we celebrate, let's make sure to work as hard as we can to pass on an america that is worthy not only of our past but also of our future. god bless you guys. i love you. we'll see you tomorrow. [ applause ] ♪ >> the president of the united states, with the first lady and the vice president and the second lady over at the national building museum here in washington. the festivities only just beginning. getting ready for the big inauguration tomorrow. piers morgan is getting ready to take over our coverage. great to have you here on the national mall. >> very exciting. i have never done an inauguration before. incredibly exciting. i was struck there by the body of the language. seems very relaxed man and comes from being re-elected and facing another great, historic day, a man much more at ease than perhaps the nerve last time. >> four years as president and now another four years and he was
is to defeat the republicans in the midterm election, to just run on politics, tactically maneuver, defeat republicans, don't worry about the nation, and do what he wants to do in the final two years? >> i am for striking deals, if you watch that movie, lincoln, you're for striking deals -- i'm for cutting deals, but i'm not just for saying everybody should come together because here i am. >> but last night -- >> when you say be ruthless, if a republican, if a tea party member said be ruthless people would be screaming at you. >> what i think he should do -- >> anderson says -- >> well, i wasn't quoting, i was -- >> i'm sure i did use that word. that means it's not just saying come let's reason together. give them something, and then take something. do the grimy realistic -- sometimes unpleasant work of running the country. >> and this is the magic that the movie "lincoln" illustrated. the passage of the 13th amendment happened in a far more polarized congress than the current congress we have. if they can do anything -- president obama is not going to have a major legacy piece in terms of
that they're willing to work with this president? now that he has won two elections, and clearly the last one? >> you know, i hope so. we talk off camera -- >> you don't sound confident. >> well, here is the thing there are a lot of good folks in the republican caucus. i want to say that. and i mean that. but once they start voting, will they vote their conscience or will they vote what the tea party extremists demand. and that is the question. that's a question they have to answer. now some of their leaders said we're going to give -- we're going to take him out. our key agenda is to take out obama and make him a one-term president. they failed. i hope enough republicans are out there to do what is right now. >> congressman, four years ago tonight, there were a group of republicans that met at a restaurant. >> yes, there was. >> that set the course of obstruction. and they said we're going to say no to everything. what kind of dinner are they going to have tonight? >> is crow on the menu? >> i said that earlier today in our broadcast. they should probably be serving that today. but the p
concern. i want to play something that ted cruz, newly elected texas senator, republican, had to say this weekend, about gun control. and let's come back and talk about it. >> you know, there actually isn't the so-called gun show loophole, that doesn't exist. any licensed firearm dealer that else at a gun show has to have a background check. what it doesn't apply to is personal sales, one on one. and that's true whether it's at a gun show or -- >> i would point out, the key there is a licensed firearm dealer. some of these people, you can sort of apply as a, you know, you sell at a gun show occasionally, that's the gun show loophole. but, ted cruz gets to speak for lots and lots of people. how do you navigate, whether it's in delaware or nationally with what your father is trying to do, how do you navigate the politics of this? there's a reason the assault weapons ban sunseted in '04, because the politics of it simply didn't sustain. there's a reason barack obama didn't talk all that much about it in 2008. how do you keep the momentum to do something? >> the facts are important. sena
. >> commissioners, item 8, election of the president of the small business commission. allows the commissioners to elect a member of the commission to serve as president of the commission, requires a motion and vote. >> commissioner o'brien? >> director, would you like me to read the procedures into the record? >> no, will you please read the procedures. >>> commissioner issues will read the procedures into the record. the commission will vote on president followed by vice president. for each position the secretary will call for nominations. the next nominees will provide statements and other commissioners will make comments. following this, the commission will hold public comments, finally the secretary will take a roll call vote in the order of those nominated. the first commissioner who receives four votes for each respective officer position will hold office for the next 12 months. if nobody does, the process will be re-opened and the process will be repeated. i have a tracking sheet that will be used to track the votes. >> commissioner o'brien? >> so at this point we can nominate, ri
scheme for the presidential election in their state in time for 2016. the republican governor and the majority leader in the senate have ball said that they support that idea for pennsylvania. the beltway is supposedly fixated on elections and election process, but here is an election process story that could use some beltway fixation. if you want to look into a yourself, we have built a tool kit of links on the story at our web site. thanks for being with us tonight. it's time for the last word with loans or adonal. have a great night. >> the assailant had a 100 clip magazine. now had his weapon not jammed, got knows how many more people would have been killed. in newtown, some of those children were riddled with # 1 11 bullet holes in a first grader. high-capacity magazines are our view are not worth the risk [ applause ] >> vice president biden then explained why this time is different. there are some who say why the most powerful voice in this debate belongs to those to save lives. i think they are wrong. this time, this time will not be like times that have come before. n
is this is a real imperative. what's new, it also is now an imperative for republicans. the election results from last november made clear the republican party needs a message for latino, asian-americans and immigrant groups if they have any chance of recapturing the white house. >> scott, this is carla marinucci. what's your thoughts on this? we've seen paul ryan, marco rubio extend a hand to president obama so to speak and suggest they are ready to talk about immigration reform. what's the biggest hurdle here? >> well, i think the biggest hurdle in the end is going to be politics, of course, but the issue of citizenship. what marco rubio outlined this week and last weekend is very close to what president obama talked about in 2011. and so i think that will provide some cover for other republicans. when you've got someone like marco rubio, a rising star in the party, paul ryan, saying we're ready to do a deal here, but the devil is in the details as they always say. democrats feel very emboldened on this issue, and they're going to sort of, you know, swing for the fences. they want full legal st
represented for our community in terms of a step forward. we are now elected lgbt peep to office and harvey was such an incredible trail blazer, not? in just getting elected, but in being a great leader and always holding his head high for our community. and i know when i was first sworn into office, one of the things that i always kept in mind was something that i understand harvey to have said, * that when you go into city hall, you walk up the central staircase. you don't walk on one of the side staircases because for our community, it is so important for us to walk up that central staircase and for us to be in the middle of everything and for everyone to know that we are here. and all these years later, we've made a lot of strides in the lgbt community, but we still have so much work to do around hiv issues, around our youth, around discrimination, around transinclusion, and all the things that we know that harvey had he been here today would still be working on and leading on. and, so, we have to keep doing our work. and frankly, we can't take for granted that queer people are going t
elected officials. i won. i won. i am far less naive today than i was four years ago but far more certain today who i am and where i want to take this country over the next four years. basically, that's what that peach was. >> what's the practical fact, he talked about climate change. he won't pass cap and trade through the house. >> when i heard that line, what struck me is this is the obama-care of the second ad administration. climate change is the sleeping dog issue that he is going to be what he will fashion piecemeal. i think that will be part of the second term legacy what he gets done. not so much the social stuff a lot of people certainly in the conservative movement concern themselves with, the bigger idea that falls into that broader vision. he reformed one six of the nation's economy with health care. now, he will go to the next level with global change on the environment. i see that as a sleeper and agree it was a very progressive speech. the idea he's putting a period on the reagan period saying this is a new day, we're going a new way and these are the agenda items i will t
to work. the beauty of the private sector is that we don't have to win an election, convince cross or pass a bill to do what we think is right. hallelujah. very good point. but some well mart workers is really sure that walmart is doing the right thing. one employee is a navy vet who is now a part of the walmart workforce said you're still subject to extremely low wages poor benefits, if that's the best that's available for veterans, then there's something wrong. now we've talked on this show about the problematic way that walmart treats its employees but in this case i would like to applaud them for doing the right thing. i would like to bring. anthony pike, we should mention the iava received a $150,000 grant from walmart to help with displaced veterans in new york. he comes from new york as well. anthony, welcome inside "the war room." >> thank you for having me. it's a pleasure to be here tonight. >> jennifer: you bet. tell us what it's been like for veterans coming home, to the not be able to find jobs as fast as non-veterans. >> the our counterparts over the last two years have been
can still win elections without them. >> well, david, five states where gop lawmakers have introduced billed making it illegal to enforce president obama's new executive action and gun proposals, another example of states' rights and nullifications. the states of tennessee, wyoming, south carolina and north dakota. so here we are with a states' rights movement live and well in 2013. this is unreal. >> well, i don't think these guys truly understand the constitution. under the constitution, which they claimed to cherish, you know, it's not yahoo sheriffs who get to decide whether something is constitutional or not. it's something called the supreme court. so right away, they're undermining our entire system by issuing their edicts or their fiats against these actions. but i'm still waiting. i'm waiting for any of these guys to come out and say okay, 23 executive actions? which ones don't you like? the ones that make it easier for universal background checks to be -- to happen as they should be happening, just on the basis of regulations and guidances? what law -- which executive action
at the white house. newly elected members of the congress, only 27 of the newly-elected house members showed up. and more recently. no elected republicans elected a white house screening of "lincoln" last month. had they all attended, they would have joined not only nancy prksz pelosi and harry reid but tommy lee jones. as tip o'neil said, love the sinner, hate the sin. we need to get back to a time when president reagan would invite the speaker, tip o'neil. there's no shortage of parties planned around inauguration 2013. here's hoping that it sill it spills over to the next four years. both sides become more social, more civil and, hence, more productive. thanks for being with us. politics nation with al sharpton starts right now. >> thanks, michael. and thanks to you for tuning in. tonight's lead, i'll second that. we're just three days away from history. president obama will be sworn in for the second time on the steps of the capital. and he looks pretty happy about it. take a look at his official second term portrait released today. that's a man who won a decisive election. who's proud of h
as president. that's a hair above the 51% that put him back in office in the november election. 61% say he's easy-going and likable. 55% say he can handle a crisis. 51% say he's a good commander in chief. while only 29% say that he works effectively with congress. we'll be right back. >>> welcome back to "hardball." one of president obama's first major challenges in his second term will be trying to get significant new gun control legislation through the congress, but can he do it? if the outrageous opposition coming from the right is any indication, the president has a major fight on his hands. the nra has labeled him an elitist hypocrite and called out his daughters who receive secret service protection. yesterday senator ted cruz accused the president of exploiting the murder of children to push through gun control legislation, and then there are the real nuts out there. a movement of people who say that the sandy hook tragedy was a hoax. the real purpose was to create a political environment to take away all our guns. the american public is largely on board with at least some of the pr
, the white house held a reception for newly elected members of the congress, only 27 of the new republican house members showed up. that's out of a record freshman class that totaled 87. more recently no elected republicans elected a white house screening of "lincoln" last month. had mitch mcconnell, john boehner, lamar alexander attended, they were all invited, they would have joined not only nancy pelosi, harry reid but steven spielberg, tommy lee jones. as tip o'neill famously said about his political foe, ronald reagan, love the sinner. hate the sin. when president reagan would invite the speaker, tip o'neill over to the white house for drinks and raise a glass to one another. there's no shortage of parties planned around inauguration 2013. here is hoping it spills over to the next four years and both sides of the aisle make a move to be more social and more civil. and, hence, more productive. that's "hardball" for now. thanks for being with us. "the ed show" with ed schultz, starts right now. >>> good evening, americans. welcome "the ed show" from new york. republicans are raising the
doesn't have to worry about being re-elected. he's got four years left and it's an opportunity for him to really go for it. >> well, i think we're going to see a president with a new level and a new kind of resolve as we did through the campaign. i think we're going to see some of the things we heard about already in terms of immigration reform and new moves around gun safety. i think we'll see some progress on the peacekeeping around the world, and we will see an emphasis on economic growth, which is absolutely key. >> now, he's obviously facing big, tough challenges certainly economically, and also with the republicans who still hold the house. it's a fine line, isn't it? he's already shown a sign since he got re-elected he's not going to take any nonsense from the republicans and he's being pretty tough on them. but that's not necessarily going to help him get stuff done. it may, if anything, make them more intransgent. how does he play that tricky line? >> well, you know, probably he's the better one to answer that question, but i think it's more and more apparent to the american p
that what we are celebrating is not the election or swearing in of a president, but what we are doing is celebrating each other and celebrating this incredible nation that we call home. after we celebrate, let's make sure to work as hard as we can to pass on an america that is worthy not only of our past but also of our future. god bless you guys. i love you. we will see you tomorrow. (applause) >> the president and the first lady the vice president, the second lady seeming chipper after his official swearing in earlier today. this party was a candlelight vigil. it's not exactly a vigil, it's more of a party. there are a lot of people in that room who paid a lot of money for this inauguration and prior to tonight to get barack obama re-elected. to get a flavor of what's going on in the room these are individual and corporate donors. to get tickets to this event if you were an individual if you wanted the washington package in addition to a couple seats to the parade or other items you had to donate 250,000 dollars if you were a corporation you had to donate a million. the packages wen
is not the election or swearing in of a president. what we're doing is celebrating each other and celebrating this incredible nation that we call home. after we celebrate let's make sure to work as hard as we can to pass on an america that is worthy not only of our past but also of our future. god bless you guys. i love you. we'll see you tomorrow. [ applause ] >> the president of the united states with the first lady and the vice president and the second lady over at the national building museum here in washington. the festivities only just beginning. getting ready for the big inauguration tomorrow. piers morgan is getting ready to take over the coverage. >> very exciting. i've never done on a inauguration before. i'm struck by the body language of the president. he seems a very relaxed man. he looks a man much more at ease with himself than the nerves and stuff that came last time. >> four years as president and now another four years. he was reelected pretty impressively. i think that brings a sense of self-confidence and you can see that coming through. >> it won't be the same huge crowds
2012 election cycle. it's an opportunity to kind of reflect on american history and create a sense of unity. the most raccus was andrew jackson. when he got to the white house they were serving cider and people trashed the place. he slipped out the back of the executive mansion as it was called then and fled to alexandria and went to a tavern. he's tapped to be president. he took a barge to new york city and is sworn in. it's wrought with tradition. this is a time for the people to be glad that democracy works. the whole world is watching now. >> the longest inaugural was william henry harrison. >> he gave this long winded speech and got will. it was freezing weather. he died only a month later from his own inaugural. you don't want to be ranked below william henry harrison. >> what are you looking for tomorrow? >> most important is to have some kind of healing message. this is not a state of the union address. this is the president carefully reading lincoln's second inaugural, the poetry and language of it. i do think that barack obama, since the first one was historic for him, he
it that necessarily in your face but he was standing by some things he felt he got elected on but how will it be perceived? some republicans have already said they are not happy. >> he was direct, blunt, and aggressive. this was an address where the president said i won the election, and i am be aggressive in the second term to push my agenda. republicans will not be happy. democrats will be fired up about the idea high could be a bit more aggressive the second term than in the first term. folks on the left are happy he got health care reform done. that he got the stimulus. a lot of democrats believe he did not go hard enough against the republicans in the first time. to become the first president to use the word "gay" in an address or to defend entitlement programs at a time when everyone in washington is talking about debt and deficits, he threw down the gauntlet and made clear, i won the election, i will stand for these following things. he did not go in great detail. he does that next month. he made clear he is coming out where he is and he will come out swinging and he thinks he
to washington, you already paid for it. well, this is the day they all voted for. and this country elected this president, elections matter, everyone who went to the polling place went to the trouble of getting involved in this campaign. it's getting the reality of it to come true today. i am curious, i know the president is committed to do something about public safety. we can see that in his heart since newtown. we know he wants to do something on immigration because the there to be fixed and both parties want to deal with it fur all kinds of reasons. i'm waiting to see if there's a halfton in his speech today, something about rebuilding this country. i think this president's instincts are good on war and peace. i hope they are good about building this country. i wish the labor unions and all kinds of people would get out to say, let's do what we did when eisenhower was president, a moderate republican. build this country up, rebuild our highways, our bridges, our big cities and transit systems, inner city transportation, really build up this country with jobs. all this talk about debt,
and losers of elections move on with their lives of dignity. we thank you again for the inspiration of our nation's founders and the legacy they left us with. may the members of this assembly and all americans be worthy of that legacy. may all that is done this day be for your greater honor and glory. amen. the speaker: the chair has examined the journal of the last day's proceedings and announces to the house his approval thereof. pursuant to clause 1 of rule 1 the journal stands approved. the pledge of allegiance today will be led by the gentleman from michigan, mr. walberg. mr. walberg: please join together in the pledge. i pledge allegiance to the flag of the united states of america and to the republic for which it stands, one nation under god, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all. the speaker: the chair will entertain one-minute speeches at a later time today. pursuant to section 5-a of house resolution 5, the chair now recognizes the gentleman from virginia, mr. goodlatte, for the reading of the constitution. mr. goodlatte: thank you, mr. speaker. mr. speaker, this morning
our other elected officials and community partners especially at this time of year to bring some financial relief to folks that are strugglings that is rewarding and that is why we are in this business and this is why we have other elect elected officials in this for all the trucestic reasonses do good and make a difference in people's lives and this is irrespective of when you accomplish it but, i'll say that it's an added sweetener as it were to top announced in the holiday time when we know there are folks that are struggling and blink a little bit of relief to them and on the path to financial stability that is a rewarding thing. thank you very much. ♪ ♪ ♪ >> the san francisco playground's history dates back to 1927 when the area where the present playground and center is today was purchased by the city for $27,000. in the 1950s, the center was expanded by then mayor robinson and the old gym was built. thanks to the passage of the 2008 clean and safe neighborhood parks bond, the sunset playground has undergone extensive renovation to its four acres of fields, courts, p
, democrats running for re-election and most of them come from midwestern, western states. they have strong, rural communities and therefore are a lot more open to maintaining gun rights and so you will have a lot of these democrats who will be very nervous voting for any big changes and harry reid is one of them. the national rifle association stayed out of the reelection race and he owes it to them to perhaps temper the debate and not necessarily let all of this go through. >> that's one reason why you're seeing the president take executive action and that's something you heard critics and people who had been his supporters criticized him for not doing more of that in his first term and he's signaling that he's willing to do more of that on these big fights and it's about seizing the moment because the further and further you get from the sandy hook tragedy, the less you're likely to achieve and he's trying to make this happen swiftly. >> let's talk about second terms. how have presidents comparatively, how have they feared in his second term. that's when the big scandal happens. the iran
of the tea party caucus. the president won an election that many say he shouldn't have won given the sluggish recovery. he beat your party. democrats beat a bit more in the senate. do you feel republicans need to change in the second obama term? >> i think a few of them are, john, and i'm certainly not. those of us who won an election, we see our constituents as deserving the best representation we can give them. we won elections too. this is an interesting day today, this peaceful transfer, a constitutional way of the power and vision by our founding fathers, and they understood the separation of powers. they knew there was going to be a clash in the confrontation and a struggle between the parties, but we also know we have to run this government. it's going to be interesting as this unfolds. this should be a healing day. then tomorrow morning, we can start that harder work you mentioned. >> reporter: let's talk about the harder work. some of it divides your party internally. other parts divide his party internally. there's been a talk that maybe immigration reform is a place there could be
before women got the right to vote. and now we just had a historic election where there are more women in congress than we have ever had before. it's really an incredible movement, and i work at emily's list, and emily's list has been working on it for 28 years to get more women on the pipeline. and we are picking it up. >> sam, it seems to me that the president was almost like an ich bin ein berliner speech. he's a man of color himself. but to embrace all of this together, i have never heard any of it -- none of this they. there was no they. it was all we, a lot of we. >> keep in mind, i thought the theme was that change can spark from the individual. in all these cases you have change being a grassroots entity, but it has to have a component of the state and government to help foster it, and the line that really stuck out to me was these truths can be self-evident, but they're not self-executing. what he made was a case for why there is an important role for the government to play to basically protect our rights but also to advance us as a society whether it's on climate change, immi
think he should not be, i don't know if arrogant is the right word. he won the election. he won it fair and square, to doubt about that, but i think there's been a tone of almost like an imperious tone the last few times. i'm not saying it will guarantee results if he's more outreach and republicans respond. i think he should try it. even independent voters have told me they thought the news conference last week was had too much arrogance and some of his tone. having said that, listen, he had some scars from the last four years. i guess he wants to get a little revenge. i think if he wants to make progress, he should try at least -- >> give him some advice. health care was the big first initiative or the stimulus program and health care, issues on which the republicans wanted no part of what the president wanted. and a lot of republicans say it poisoned the waters. when you look at the agenda now, there's the economy, the deficit, gun control, immigration. what should the president do first to show republicans he's not looking for revenge or looking to pick fights? >> i would say the bu
's inaugural address. >> brown: then, from tel aviv, margaret warner reports on the israeli elections, as prime minister benjamin netanyahu's party was on track to stay in power by a narrow margin. netanyahu tries to put together, it's sure to include new faces and new agendas that will influence the country. >> ifill: we examine a new study on concussions, showing the impact of hard hits on the brains of living but retired n.f.l. players. >> i go through stages where i think how come i can't remember that and i always wondered are these age-related or are they conclusion related? >> brown: and we mark the 40th anniversary of the "roe v. wade" decision by the supreme court, with a look at the strategies of abortion rights advocates and opponents. that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: close to iconic landmarks, to local life, to cultural treasures. it's a feeling that only a river can give you. these are journeys that change your perspective on the world. and perhaps even yourself. viking river cruises. exploring the world in comfort.
and claim vindication in the election. >> does a speechwriter write a draft and the president marks it up, sends it back? does the president write the first draft or sketch out an outline and speechwriter fills in the blanks? >> it's different for each president and circumstance. the worst speeches are always the state of the union addresses because everybody sees them coming a year in advance. by four years into the administration with a president who is a known accomplished writer and somebody who is proud and pride full of his literary accomplishments i'm sure he's had ideas for this. >> and close to his own speechwriter who has been with him a long time, they have a good relationship. there will be that give and take. >> at the end of the day when the speech is over, you will consider it a success if? >> if people feel better about america. i hope first it's short and second makes them feel better about the country and times they live in. >> i think if he calls attention to real problems in honest ways, but then asserts there's hope beyond the divisions of our current politics. >> tha
immigration. >> they have a big problem in national elections. >> president obama has won the election. >> the president right now has a higher approval rating certainly than congress. >> horrible numbers for congress. >> a pitiful 14%. >> pretty bad numbers on john boehner's report card. >> the debt ceiling is a dangerous game. >> i don't see that as a winner for them. >> don't fight battles you can't win. >> it is a troubled time for the party. >> let's stop for a second. >> let's make clear decisions. >> the republican strategy. >> stop talking about rape. >> don't fight battles you can't win. >> it is a troubled time for the party, get something done. >> we have to be the party of new solutions, we're not just going to be the party of no. >> it is groundhog day. >> the conservatives, the retreat, we've come a long way since. >> i'm ezra klein in for lawrence o'donnell, one of the great moments, when redford having just won the election, sits down on the bed taking it all in. the next few words are not just to ever film junky, pretty much to every political candidate. >> what do we
this election, gave him the confidence to say the election delivered a mandate for my vision of government, my vision of politics, one that involves gay rights, immigration, climate change, an issue that he hasn't really spoken of since his attempts to deal with it in 2009, fell short. so this was really a different president coming out, using the election as a turning point for his agenda and really making clear that that cautious pragmatist of the last four years, that often came out, is going to give way to someone who is unabashedly starting negotiations from a more progressive liberal standpoint than he was willing to do in the recent past. >> not surprisingly, there's been some push-back already. darrell issa said quote, i'm hoping the president will recognize that compromise should have been the words for today and they clearly weren't. john mccain said i would have liked to see a little more on outreach and working together. there was not, as i have seen in other inaugural speeches. i want to work with my colleagues. and i'm wondering what you think about this approach and i think that
all. >> next speaker. >> president chiu, supervisors, elected officials and public. i stand to be in a great deal of excitement because within our african-american tradition we are celebrating the 150th anniversary of the emancipation proclamation. i congratulate those who have been elected on this most auspicious occasion. i want to say that i think it is very good that supervisor cohen was selected as the person to be president. and i want to offer my own support of that cause. supervisor breed, you stated something about doctor king. i thought i might leave this quote with you. for doctor king said, "change does not roll in on the wheels of ineligibility, but comes through continuous struggle. men cannot ride you unless your back is bent." i hope you see this time of change of having a woman of color as a president of this board. >> president: next speaker. >> good day board. president chiu and other board members here. my name is ross rhodes, as part of the organization call ace. i'm here speaking on behalf of my other fellow brothers and sisters in the organiz
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